Yukari Iwatani Kane's "Haunted Empire" is as bad as you've heard.

I read the first paragraph of this except on Re/code and it literally stopped me in my tracks. I had to reread it several times to make absolutely sure I was getting the full effect of The Stupid. Here it is:

On the evening after the first iPhone went on sale, a couple dozen visiting designers from Samsung were dining at a Korean barbecue restaurant in San Francisco called Hanuri when a friend showed up with the device. The phone was locked, so the designers couldn’t see the home screen or open the applications. But it didn’t matter. They were impressed enough with the sleekness of the device and the elegant ease of swiping their finger to pull up the pass-code screen. They oohed and aahed as they made the gesture over and over again. They had never seen anything like it.

Do you see the problem?

Supposedly, a “friend” showed up with a brand new (it had gone on say that very day) iPhone. If that was the case, why couldn’t they unlock the phone? Where was the friend? Why couldn’t he do it? Wouldn’t he let them? Was it stolen? If they had access to the phone and access to the friend, WHY COULDN’T THEY USE THE PHONE!?

How does such an obvious oddity in storytelling get past the writer and any number of editors and fact checkers?

BTW, I read the rest of the excerpt so you don’t have to. Don’t bother.

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