Diary of a Mad Man Podcast Episode #5!

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You can listen to Episode #5 here.

Homeless man turns in $2K found on Victoria street

Canadians who allegedly posed naked on Mount Kinabalu barred from leaving Malaysia

South African lion kills U.S. tourist

Swedish donors sent SMS when their blood saves a life

Growing up I assumed EVERYONE could change a tire.

Pot smoking after work can get you fired, Colorado court rules

Strip your kale naked with the @ChefnCorp looseleaf kale and greens stripper:

Motorcycle owner fined $13,500 after bike was driven through Guildford Mall

British Plugs Are Better Than All Other Plugs, And Here’s Why

Christian couple vow to divorce if same-sex marriage is legalised

Stamford Man Calls 911 After Three-Hour Standoff With His Cat

Macworld Expo is Dead

Expo

Regardless of the spin IDG is trying to put on this, this is not a hiatus. Regardless of the hopes of attendees, Macworld Expo, Macworld/iWorld in any incarnation is well and truly dead.

No one thing killed the show. It was a death of a thousand cuts, starting with Apple abandoning the show (and, I maintain, abandoning the community that supported it for so many years) and the strength of various other outlets to get Apple’s and the vendors message out. IDG’s inability to pivot the show to “something else” also contributed, along with their inability to work with and convince vendors and attendees the show still had value.

I have been and will continue to be pilloried for my criticism of IDG and their, quite frankly, botching of so many aspects of the show. For their “fudging” of attendance figures and for their bullying of the media and vendors, among many other things. Make no mistake – a great deal of any blame for the failure of the show lies directly at the feet of IDG and their management.

But the on the floor staff of any particular Macworld Expo was always amazing. Whether it was the wonderfully bubbly Sarah Hindmarsh (now Harvey – congratulations!), the dedicated and devoted Kathy Moran or the hardest working guy at the show, Paul Kent. They did the best they could with what little IDG gave them. And their best was often better than anything anyone else could even imagine.

Jon Seff:

“That’s what I’ll miss the most—an event that drew together people I read online or communicated with on Twitter into meatspace for a few days.”

There is no trade show I’m aware of that had the constituencies of a Macworld Expo – everything from brand new users to grizzled old veterans. Artists and techies. IT pros and their customers. Shareware developers (remember those?) And huge multibillion dollar corporations. Paul Kent and his staff (and others before them) had an absolute bear of a time trying to serve all those different groups and, for the most part until Apple left, served them well.

I’ve always said the Expo wasn’t about Apple or the show floor or the vendors or the media or the announcements – although all those things were important and the show wouldn’t be a success without them – but about the people and the community. Friends, new and old. Listeners, readers, developers, colleagues, bartenders, taxi drivers, waiters. And all the fun you had with them.

I remember very few of the products or pamphlets or buttons I got at any individual Expo (hell, I went to 30+ of them around the world over the years) but I always remember the people I met and every year, looked forward to the shows to seeing them again.

I’ll miss that the most.

Oyster Festival crowd witnesses world record shucking record


The Journal Pioneer:

A 10-member Team Canada set a new Guinness Book of World Records standard for the most oysters opened in one hour.

It sounds silly (and it kinda is) but do the math.

10 guys shucked 8,840 oysters in an hour. That averages out to 884 oysters per man – Almost 15 oysters *per minute*. If you’ve ever shucked an oyster, you’ll know how amazing that is.

Pay It Forward with a Cup of Joe

EU Embraces “Suspended Coffee”:

Tough economic times and growing poverty in much of Europe are reviving a humble tradition that began some one-hundred years ago in the Italian city of Naples. It’s called caffè sospeso — “suspended coffee”: A customer pays in advance for a person who cannot afford a cup of coffee.

I saw this mentioned on Facebook by Jell Carlson. What a great idea. I’ve “often” (whenever I can afford it) buy coffee for the person behind me at Starbucks. And I almost always do it for military personnel I see in a line. It’s a little thing you can do every now and then to make a complete stranger a little bit happier.

The "Macumentary"


Way back in the mists of (internet) time, I did a show out of a professional studio in White Rock, BC with a crew of old school radio guys. I found a co-host at a MUG meeting and “The Mac Show” was born. I’d been doing a “broadcast” for several years before meeting these guys but it was definitely not as good as what it eventually became.

We had a great time and the radio guys taught me a lot about how to do things properly. It’s a real shame the relationship fell apart.

A show listener and professional videographer, Adam Tinkoff, pitched the idea of this “macumentary” to us and MacAddict magazine. This video was included on the magazine’s CD-Rom (remember when magazines would give those out?) in August 2001.